07 8 / 2013

pocproblems:

queennubian:

neoafrican:

This is exactly how I feel when I talk to White people about race, racism, privilege, etc…It’s exhausting and confounding at the same damn time.

"Maybe black people aren’t interested in my job." …….::Flips the table and walks out::

haha yo she is to done

Wagatwe!

(Source: sandandglass, via lchumato)

Permalink 65,402 notes

25 6 / 2013

rhrealitycheck:

Click here or the image to donate! All donations made today, Tuesday, June 25th, 2013, will go to the people’s filibuster!
Don’t know what’s going on in Texas? Read about the filibuster here.

rhrealitycheck:

Click here or the image to donate! All donations made today, Tuesday, June 25th, 2013, will go to the people’s filibuster!

Don’t know what’s going on in Texas? Read about the filibuster here.

Permalink 313 notes

24 6 / 2013

"

Covering Texas politics as a feminist journalist, one of the things I hear a lot is: Why don’t you leave? What else do you expect … it’s Texas?

To those people, I say this: I see your smugness. It is a sign of passivity and privilege. And it is dangerous.

"

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24 5 / 2013

"As David McCullough wrote in his book, The Great Bridge: The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge , “By and by it was common gossip that hers was the great mind behind the great work and that this, the most monumental engineering triumph of the age, was actually the doing of a woman, which as a general proposition was taken in some quarters to be both preposterous and calamitous. In truth, she had by then a thorough grasp of the engineering involved.” As the project faced delays and cost increases, skepticism mounted that the bridge could be completed under Washington Roebling’s guidance and it was proposed that he be removed as chief engineer. Emily Roebling wrote down her husband’s statement, citing the reasons why he should not be displaced. She delivered it as an address before the American Society of Civil Engineers - a brave move on her part, as women who spoke in public often were not well-received in those days."

Roebling, Emily Warren

I’ve always been sort of obsessed with the Brooklyn Bridge, but I became more so last year after Cristian took me on a tour of it led by a woman from the Brooklyn Historical Society. She taught us about the bridge’s largely unrecognized feminist history: Emily Roebling (the wife and daughter-in-law of the two dudes who always get credit for designing and building the bridge) totally built that shit!

Today the Brooklyn Bridge turns 130, so pour one out for Em.Roeb.

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25 4 / 2013

After Big Kitty had his drink from the sink this morning, George got up there to… do whatever he’s doing here.

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21 3 / 2013

Spirit animal.

Spirit animal.

(Source: mothereffervescent)

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07 3 / 2013

rhrealitycheck:

The 18 For-Profit Companies Fighting to Eliminate the Birth Control Benefit 

a) This is an important story I helped work on today.b) Did you know RHRC has an amazing Tumblr? We do, we do!

rhrealitycheck:

The 18 For-Profit Companies Fighting to Eliminate the Birth Control Benefit

a) This is an important story I helped work on today.

b) Did you know RHRC has an amazing Tumblr? We do, we do!

Permalink 455 notes

13 2 / 2013

heckyeahlucilleballilovelucy:

Born a brunette, Lucille Ball was turned into a platinum blonde by Hattie Carnegie, the New York designer for whom Lucille Ball modeled in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Carnegie thought Lucy resembled (then-blonde) actress Joan Bennett, a Carnegie client. Her hair remained blonde and became gradually darker (brownish) until she arrived at MGM in the 1940s. It was there that famous hair designer Sydney Guilaroff created the flaming red-orange shade with which Lucy became forever identified. Lucy herself said her career was basically blah until she became a redhead, and then things took off. 

In her book, The Encyclopedia of Hair: A Cultural Study, Victoria Sherrow writes that, “Red hair became more popular in the twentieth century both in Europe and the United States. Some historians say that color films and television [i.e, Lucy?] played a key role, since blond and red shades show up well in those media. Other analysts point out that red hair was often associated with a passionate personality type.” This begs the fascinating question: which came first: Lucy Ricardo’s red hair or her passionate desire to get out of the house and into show business?
- Lucy A to Z by Michael Karol 
(Here shown in Du Barry Was a Lady, 1943) 

She is so glorious.

(via for-redheads)

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04 2 / 2013

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04 1 / 2013

r-dart:

Now you know the truth of what’s going through my mind at parties.

Shout out to my fellow introverted cat ladies.

r-dart:

Now you know the truth of what’s going through my mind at parties.

Shout out to my fellow introverted cat ladies.

(via mothereffervescent)

Permalink 199,863 notes